REPLAY IS A WELCOME CHANGE, HOME-PLATE BLOCKING NOT SO MUCH

By Art Beitchman

The new replay rules took effect this baseball season, and the key questions were: (1) How long would each instant look at different angles take? and (2) Could replay really make a difference in the game?
Only about a month of games have been played, but I’ve seen it be a success. As far as time passed, only two-to-four minutes isn’t much, and more importantly, the correct call is being made.
It’s been long overdue that replays are being instituted , a few years back umpire Jim Joyce blew a call at first base that would have been the final out of a perfect game bid. The batter was clearly out, and now that pitcher has a one-hitter under his belt, instead of being in baseball history forever with a perfect game.
The new no blocking home plate rule is much more ambiguous. The first time it came up for debate was in a Phillies game early on in the season. The umps looked at the replay and got the call totally wrong. The Phillies even got a call from Joe Torre, MLB executive vice president of baseball operations, to apologize to the team for blowing the call at home plate. If the umpires really don’t know how to make a final determination, how does the runner know where to go, and the catcher know where to set up.
The rule was put in place after the gruesome injury to Giants catcher Buster Posey a couple years ago, but the natural confrontation at home plate has been a big part of MLB since 1880, I don’t think because of one injury at the plate, that battle should be legislated out of existence.

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