By Michael Donovan

Let’s get one thing straight.

The Eagles were 7-9 in 2015, largely because the defense couldn’t stop anyone and also because the D-boss was a boob.

In an interview with the Daily News, former coordinator Billy Davis put a lot of the onus for the defense’s failures on the inside linebackers, naming both Mychal Kendricks, who is still with the Eagles and Kiko Alonso, who was traded to the Miami Dolphins.

“We were really struggling with the linebackers covering the running backs and the tight ends. It poses a lot of problems when you can’t get that matchup right. . . .

“Mychal [Kendricks], sometimes Mychal kind of drifts on you at the wrong time. He makes some great plays, but there are other plays that hurt you.”

“Then DeMeco gets nicked up and goes down and the young kid [Hicks] comes in and does a great job. He was a great quarterback. But then he gets hurt, and now, Mychal or Kiko, one of those two have to be the quarterback. And neither one of them could do that. That’s not what they do best.

“When they had to be the quarterback, things changed, and it got a little difficult [for them] to do their own job. You have to line everybody else up and then line yourself up and they couldn’t do it.”

Kendricks hadn’t seen the story when first approached by N.J. Advance Media. After he did, he responded.

“For him to bring my name up it was kind of a situation where I was surprised because I wasn’t healthy,” Kendricks said “I pulled my hamstring running down on special teams in the Dallas game and then I was out (for three of the next four games). With the rotation we had and I don’t know why we rotated, we were sound in ’13 and ’14 with the people we had.

“But we traded a really good player (LeSean McCoy) for another good player (Alonso). I do what I’m told. I played when they put me in to play. I wasn’t in and it wasn’t because, I couldn’t tell you. And if you asked around they wouldn’t be able to tell you, either. You know, I wasn’t traded for LeSean McCoy.”

In 13 games in 2015, Kendricks had 91 tackles, eight for a loss, three sacks, and a forced fumble. He played 52 percent of the defensive snaps.

In 2013 and ’14, he had a combined 245 tackles, seven for a loss, eight sacks, three interceptions, four forced fumbles and four fumble recoveries. He played 83 percent of the snaps in ’13 and 66 percent in ’14.

“I think there’s some truth to what he said. I think I do play better when I don’t have to control the entire defense,” Kendricks said. “I was also hurt. I wasn’t able to be as effective as I was in 2013 and 2014. I mean everyone has strengths, everyone has weaknesses. I’m a leader in so many different ways, other than just controling the field.”